Tag Archives: husband

Can You See Me? I’m Here In The Darkness. (Part 3)

24 Feb

As I concentrated on that feeling of smallness and aloneness, my husband nudges my shoulder propelling me out of my reflection.

“Hey Shannon? Have you tried shaking your head?”

“No.” I reply laughing at his enthusiasm for the experience.

“Try it. I’ve been doing it for the last 5 minutes.” He chuckles.

I start shaking my head back and forth, imitating Oli’s constant head movement.

“What’s it doing for you?” I ask Seth after a minute.

“I feel like I can hear the sounds around me better. I hear something different each time I turn my head.” He tells me. “What are you getting out of it?”

“Dizzy.” I respond. “I could only do it for a minute before I started feeling like I wanted to throw up.” I am a person who couldn’t even ride the Teacups at the county fair without wanting to throw up.

While I was sitting there my eye was continually drawn to a little red light on the ceiling. I’m guessing it was a smoke detector light or something like that. In the darkness I could orient myself to that light. Every once in a while another small light would be illuminated in the back of the room. I think it was from staff coming in and out and lifting a curtain.

Although I was WAY more secure sitting in my chair and not walking around in the dark, I was immediately drawn to any kind of change in the blackness. When I would see that little bit of light, a tiny tiny minute change in the texture of the dark, my body seemed to be able to orient itself to it. I instantly knew where I was in space. I didn’t feel so lost. I began to realize why it has taken Oli so long to be aware of where her body is. I began to recognize the HUGE importance of teaching her orientation with regards to herself and her environment because she doesn’t have any kind of light perception.

All of a sudden the lessons that I had been learning and teaching her made absolute and complete real sense to me. A light went off and I felt it. I felt why it was so important.

“It’s now time for the question and answer part of our night here at the Blind Café. The blind waiters and waitresses are inviting you to ask questions about what it is like living as a blind person.” The man who made this whole night possible, Rosh Rocheleau, stands up and introduces them.

“Everyone who has a question raise their hand.” This statement is met with a nervous, awkward silence and then followed by laughter as the waiters begin to laugh. Oh? It’s okay to have a sense of humor about this whole thing?

I think sometimes people are so insecure and uncomfortable around people who are different from them that they forget that they are just like everyone else. They are smart, funny, happy, real people. Except for the fact that they cannot see, they are just the same as you. The blind wait staff made us feel like it was okay. It was okay to ask the typical questions about blindness. They were so comfortable and confident in themselves, they tolerated the ridiculous questions and were happy to dispel many myths. I have to say, I was slightly annoyed at some people’s stereotypical questions about blindness. However, I am not afraid to admit that I too, have had similar questions when I first learned about blindness.

People asked questions like “Do you see in your dreams?”

Answer: “No.” People who have been blind since birth don’t see in their dreams because their brains just don’t work like that. They have never seen anything so their subconscious has no reference to input visual pictures into their dreams. They dream in smell, sound, and touch.

“Are your other senses super enhanced? Did they become heightened?”

Answer: “No. We don’t develop super powers like Superman.” A blind person’s hearing and sense of smell are the same as everyone else’s. If measured I’m sure it would be at a normal, appropriate level. Blind people just learn to use their senses better than you or I. They pay better attention to things that we generally don’t because we experience our world about 60% of the time through vision.

“Do you hate it when people say things like ‘Did you listen to American Idol last night’?”

Answer: “Yes. Absolutely. I try to be nice about it and if someone says ‘Did you listen to ….’ I respond, ‘Yes. I watched….last night.’ You don’t have to adapt your vocabulary just because I can’t see. I still use words like: see, look, watch….because they are acceptable terms in our language.”

“What is another one of your pet peeves that people do to blind people?”

Answer: “I hate it when I go out to a bar or restaurant with my friends and the bartender asks my friend what I want. They don’t ask me. They’ll say things like ‘What does he want?’ You can talk to me. Hello! I’m standing right here! I also hate it when I give them my money and they hand my change back to my friend. They never hand it to me. Ummm….it’s MY money. You can give it directly to me. Sometimes people treat me like I’m a child or incapacitated and I hate that.”

“What is a relationship like with another blind person vs. a sighted person?”

Answer: “Really, it’s the same. There is just a much bigger learning curve and much more teaching involved in dating a sighted person.”

(Check back again. I STILL have more to tell you. I could probably write a whole book on this experience:)

Can You See Me? I’m Here In The Darkness. (Part 2)

23 Feb

As I continued my experience randomly selecting food and taking small fearful bites (you never know when they would sneak in another olive, or infinitely worse, a bit of cilantro) I start listening to the conversations around me. I turn my head to the left and listen.

Perk. No one could see that I was eavesdropping.

They were talking about what brought them here tonight. Most people had just heard about it and thought it would be an interesting thing to try. I speak up and say that I have a blind daughter. They start asking me questions about her and want to know what she has to say about blindness. I explain that Oli has autism and doesn’t talk. A woman across from me and to my left starts to tell me about her friends daughter who is also autistic. We are interrupted by a loud voice behind me.

“Seth’s wife? Seth’s wife?”

“I’m here!” I call out.

Were you wondering where my husband was during my first moments in the café?

Where else?

In the bathroom. Minutes before we followed the waitress behind the curtain and stumbled into the darkness, Seth decides he has to pee.

I guess the line was really long because he hadn’t returned when it was our turn to be seated. I knew he would find me eventually.

I grab his hand, well. . .I try to grab his hand, but really just keep grabbing our waitress Faith’s hand.

“Nope. Your still holding onto Faith.” She tells me as she tries to guide me to Seth’s hand.

“See? Woman hand.” I touch her smooth hand. “Man hand” She laughs as I finally grasp hold of Seth.

“Ahhh. . .very important detail. Smooth soft girlie hands and rough man hands.” I say giggling about my complete ignorance.

I really need to concentrate and let me other senses take over. I am focusing on the blackness with my eyes. Opening them wide and trying to discern any tiny shape, form or different shade of darkness. There was nothing and I am disoriented.

After Seth is seated I turn back to my left and try to speak to the woman about her friends daughter again.

“So your friend’s daughter has autism?” I speak in the direction I had before.

There is no reply.

My voice seems small and gets lost amidst the other conversations. I have no other way to get her attention because I cannot make eye contact with her and don’t know where she is to touch her arm. I don’t even know her name.

All of a sudden I feel very alone and lost. I feel unseen and unnoticed.

Is this what it is like for Oli? She can’t see me and she can’t talk to me.

Does this sweet little girl feel unnoticed, unheard, lost and afraid in her world of darkness?

I slump in my chair as my heart begins to feel unbearably heavy. I sit back as those startling realizations hit me and think about that moment.

I think about how I am feeling at that exact point in time and try to burn it into my brain. I don’t want to forget it because I am learning. I am finally learning a very small part about what it is really like living in Oli’s world.

(Check back later. I have more to tell you!)

Seth Was On The Teacups; I Was Still On The Tornado

21 Feb

“Home is where you are loved the most and act the worst.” ― Marjorie Pay Hinckley

I remember that first year of Oli’s life being full of incredible pain and sadness. I remember wishing that she was older so I could just get past all of those feelings. I thought that she would just hit some magical age and all of those feelings would just disappear in an instant.

“If only she was 6 months old…”

Then she turned 6 months. Nope. The pain was still there.

“If only she was 1…” Nope.

I couldn’t understand why I just couldn’t get over it?

Seth made a comment when Oli was about 6 months old that he was so glad the first 6 months were over because he felt so much better. The roar of our wild roller coaster ride had dulled to the excitement of the Teacups.

I looked at him and smiled.

“Yes. Me too. I feel the same way.”

I didn’t feel that way at all. Not one tiny bit. I felt exactly the same as the moment when the doctor said she didn’t have any eyes.

I…was stuck.

I feel like I missed enjoying Oli as a baby because I spent every waking moment worrying about her.

When she turned 1 and it was time for her to get her eyes I thought that, that would be the moment I had been waiting for. She would get eyes and everything would be right with the world again.

Nope. It didn’t happen then either.

Don’t get me wrong, it helped. Once her eyes were painted, I didn’t feel like I had to hide her in her car seat when we went out to avoid the stares and the comments.

It made it a little bit better, but it turned out that it wasn’t her appearance that was bothering me. She was beautiful either way.

The first couple of days after she got her first pair of painted conformers was a mixture of highs and lows.

(Her first pair fit perfectly and were not crooked.) The moment Beverly put them in and turned Oli around to face us was incredible. Suddenly my girl had perfect, beautiful blue eyes.

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She had eyes.

We couldn’t stop staring at her, turning her this way and that. Examining her face from every possible angle. Oli had a funny look on her face, feeling the emotion in the room.

“Oh, Oli. Look at you! Look at your eyes baby! You’re so beautiful!” I gushed over her and cried with emotion.

We got back into the car and started the drive back to Las Vegas. Oli was still in a car seat facing the back seat so I couldn’t see her face when I turned around to check on her. I found myself making up excuses to stop the car. Suddenly I had an attack of the munchies, the thirsties, and needed 10 bathroom breaks on the drive home. Of course I had to take Oli out with me. (Even though Seth was still in the car.) I would get her out of her seat, pick her up, and then spend 5 minutes just staring. It was an amazing day.

The next morning the rush of that high faded and I began my descent to another low.

They had given her a pair of eyes, but she still couldn’t see me with them.

My girl still couldn’t see.

Please Don’t Let Her Arm Fall Off

16 Feb

“Sometimes beautiful things come into our lives out of nowhere. We can’t always understand them, but we have to trust in them. I know you want to question everything, but sometimes it pays to just have a little faith.”
― Lauren Kate, Torment

Fortunately because my two small children were in the car with us that cold day in January it ensured that my husband’s enthusiasm for an adventure took a back seat. We made it to Oli’s surgery appointment unscathed, unstuck and virtually un-traumatized.

It was scary riding with a driver who was unfamiliar driving in the snow on gravel roads in the middle of the desert, but Seth was cautious. We got to the hospital 2 hours late to her appointment. I had gotten a hold of the surgeon when we realized that we were going to be late and she told us to go ahead and come whenever we could.

They prepped Oli for surgery and the nurses whisked my baby girl off to the operating room shortly afterwards. We were assured that Oli was in good hands and were sent to the waiting room.

I had never been the parent of a patient before Oli was born. One time I had to take Kekoa to the ER when he was 4 months old because of a high fever. We were only there long enough to make sure he didn’t have an infection and then left.

This was nothing like that.

I knew they were going to be cutting into my baby, however minor the operation was.

THEY WERE GOING TO CUT INTO MY BABY!!!

I had been involved in lots of surgeries with babies before Oli, but none was my child. My heart went out to all of the parents who had sat in those little plastic chairs before me.The parents that I myself, had sent to the waiting room when I was the nurse on duty the day of their child’s surgery. Many times I spoke the exact same words spoken to me that morning, “She’s in good hands. Everything will be fine.”

Of course there are no guarantees. I knew that. I was terrified.

The few hours it took to perform the operation and get Oli into the recovery area were some of the longest hours of my life. Oli has had a few other surgeries since then and it never gets any easier.

Remember I am a worst-case-scenario girl.

I worry about everything from a complete power failure when my girl is still on the ventilator and unconscious down to worrying that the nurse didn’t properly swab her IV port before injecting medication into it and subsequently she gets a terrible bacterial infection and her arm falls off.

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It’s awful!

Luckily none of those things has ever happened.

I want to trust people taking care of Oli. I really do. Most of me has to or else I would drive myself crazy, but this is my baby girl. I can’t trust them completely. I don’t think any mother ever does.

Moms worry about our children the moment we realize we are having them. It’s not any more difficult, I don’t think, when you have a child with special needs. We are just given more opportunities to worry. And we are given more opportunities to trust people and have a little faith in them. Sometimes they let you down, but most of the time they don’t.

Most of the time my imagination is far worse than reality.

Good thing!! Otherwise my girl would defiantly be missing a few limbs by now.

An Adventure With Seth

15 Feb

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The morning of Oli’s fundoplication surgery (reflux surgery) I awoke in the darkness. I turn over and glance at the clock.

Uggghhh…4am. We had to be at the hospital by 6:30 and it was an hour drive. I shook Seth awake and then got into the shower. A few minutes after I got in Seth knocked on the door.

“You’re not going to believe this Shannon. There was a snow storm last night.”

“What?” Snow in Las Vegas. Sounds like no big deal right? The first time I saw flurries in the desert I laughed that they would even have the nerve to call the slightly thicker rain drops “snow”. That wasn’t snow. These people had never been to Iowa. I had about the same amount of trust in my husband and his knowledge of snow as I had in the people of Las Vegas. He was from Hawaii.

I knew that it was probably just cold and raining. At most it might look like snow falling from the sky, but would melt once it hit the ground. We were in no danger of missing my daughter’s surgery appointment. I forgot that in order to get to the appointment we had to drive over the “pass”.

Pahrump sat higher than Las Vegas and in order to get there we had to drive over a mountain at 9,700 feet elevation called the pass.

As we left the house I wondered if we really were going to make it. Snow was actually sticking to the ground. I had heard when we moved to Pahrump that the pass occasionally closed when it snowed up there, but that it only happened maybe once a year. Surely it wouldn’t be closed the one day that we absolutely had to get to Vegas. Surely our luck wasn’t that bad.

It was.

As soon as we reached the base of the mountain I could see police lights directing people to turn around and go back.

I looked over at Seth who was driving. “What now? It’s going to take a month at least, to get another surgery appointment.”

“We’re going. I will get her to this appointment.” He says with determination and a look of excitement in his eyes.

Oh no. I’ve seen that look before. That look that comes from a man who loves off-roading and driving through the back desert.

“Are you serious? The gravel roads are going to be bad. I think we should just call and cancel.”

“Nope. Don’t worry. I’ll get us there. No problem.”

I am very worried.

Seth likes a good adventure and his adventures usually end up with us being stuck somewhere. I have been on many of these “adventures” with him. I have been stuck in the desert overnight, in the mud, with nothing to drink but cheap beer and coyotes circling us looking at my little dog like a quick and easy meal. I have been stuck 5 miles from the lake, with a flat tire and no jack, no one around for miles, for hours in 110 degree heat, with nothing to drink but cheap beer. Don’t worry. We always had beer.

These are just a few examples. Others include motorcycle trips in freezing weather and extreme heat when I have been totally convinced I was going to die.

I know Seth’s idea of an adventure.

This could end badly.

You Want To Put WHAT In My Mouth?

13 Feb

“Children aren’t coloring books. You don’t get to fill them with your favorite colors.”

― Khaled Hosseini

One of the most difficult things I ever had to teach Oli was how to eat solid food.

Seems like a pretty simple thing doesn’t it?

Just open up the little jar of green, orange, or tan puree. Get the spoon ready. The baby, at this point, is watching in anticipation because they probably know what is happening. They get that look of excitement on their face like, “Really? It’s my turn?”

Usually by the time the baby is old enough for solid food they have been watching big people eat for a few months and know what to do.

See food.

See spoon.

See mommy scoop up food.

See the spoon coming towards mouth.

Greedily open mouth as wide as possible.

Get food in mouth and then immediately insert fist in mouth too.

Because really, what goes better with baby food than baby fist?

At least this was my experience with my son.

I’m sure you spotted a few obstacles that I encountered when I attempted this technique with Oli.

I got the baby food jar out and the little rubber spoon and set them on her tray. I opened the jar and had the camera ready to snap the classic baby expression that comes with the first bite of real food. I scooped up the green mush, brought it toward her face and…nothing.

My face fell when I immediately recognized my mistake.

I put the food up to her lips and watched as she clamped her mouth shut when she realized that I was trying to put something in there.

“It’s food Oli. Food like mommy and daddy eat.” I gently try to coax her into opening her mouth.

Nothing.

My baby had absolutely no frame of reference for the word “food”. She’d never seen people eat, had no idea that this was something people do, and had no clue that she was supposed to open her mouth and chew when I spoke the words “food” or “eat”.

When Seth came home that night I greeted him at the door with a bewildered look on my face.

“She doesn’t understand what food is. She doesn’t know that she’s supposed to eat. All she knows is the bottle and milk. The spoon and baby food feel nothing like these. How do we teach her to eat?”

Seth just shrugged his shoulders and gave me the reassured look that only a father who has no idea of what to do, but is confident he can work it out, can give.

“We just do. We have to show her.”

Over the next week I tried to do just that. I tried to show her that I ate food and did not drink from a bottle. I would take her little hand and raise it to my face as I ate. I let her feel the fork or spoon layered with food as I raised it to my mouth, feel the motion of my jaw as I opened and closed my mouth and then chewed.

Then I would sit her back in her highchair and attempt to feed her again.

“Come on Oli. Open your mouth just like mommy does.”

Nothing.

Eventually I was able to squeeze past her tightly closed lips and get a small amount on her tongue. She immediately tried to spit it out and stuck out her tongue. I quickly jumped at this opportunity and put a spoonful on her tongue. Unable to spit out the entire glob she was forced to close her mouth and got a chance to taste it. She realized that it tasted pretty good, but then she thought that that was the way she was supposed to eat. Every time I fed her she would stick out her tongue and expect me to put food on it. This technique soon became frustrating for her because she never got much into her mouth and most of it ended up falling off and onto her tray.

I was frustrated and again met Seth at the door after work. This time with an exasperated expression.

“I don’t know what else to do. This is not working and I’m out of ideas. Tomorrow, it’s your turn to try.”

“Ok.” He answers with that confident look on his face again. But this time rather than finding it comforting or endearing I just fine it annoying.

I’m thinking, “You think it’s going to be so easy and I’m going to laugh when you figure out that it’s more difficult than you realize.”

The next night I get everything ready for Seth’s feeding attempt and get the “I told you so” look on my face.

He sits across from Oli and then does something completely unexpected. He takes her face in his hand and gently pry’s her mouth open and puts the spoon inside.

“Open your mouth Oli.” He says as he gently taps the spoon against her lips and then opens her mouth for her.

At first the food comes right back out being thrust onto the tray by her tongue, but after a few more attempts she starts to open her mouth on her own. Soon afterwards all we had to do was ask her to open her mouth and touch her lips.

Apparently his interpretation and my interpretation of “We have to show her” were completely different.

Thanks to Seth’s straight forward attempt to show her, my girl learned how to eat.

Why would He do this to me?

1 Feb

“We love the things we love for what they are.”

― Robert Frost

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I really should have put this picture at the beginning of my story. This is Kekoa and me in the background. Yes, I was about to cry when it was taken. The picture accurately emphasizes and portrays everything that is me. When I look at it I see someone who looks absolutely terrified of the reality that has just come out of her body. Why God would choose to give someone like this a special needs child is beyond me.

I mean look at me.

I was a wreck and he was fine.

When we got home from the hospital my husband loaded the pictures from the delivery onto the computer. He pulled up this one and burst out laughing. “Look at your face! You look like you are convinced that the nurse is really a child predator and is about to run off with your baby.”

I came over and looked down at the computer screen. Yep. That is exactly what I was thinking. “Don’t laugh. I just love him so much.” I try to explain very near the brink of tears. How can he not understand? I mean this little person just came OUT OF MY BODY! I made this little guy and he is perfect. It all just became so real. When they’re in your body it’s just a faint idea. Especially when it’s your first. Once they actually come out it’s a whole new ball game.

I think I look the way I do here for a couple of reasons.

First of all, I was totally mortified by the whole child bearing experience. The gush of body fluids, squishy stuff and baby from my body was beyond embarrassing.

How would my husband ever look at me the same?

Second, I really hadn’t given the whole idea of baby = with you the rest of your life, a sufficient amount of contemplation. I just wanted a baby. But once I looked into his eyes and felt a kind of love that I had never experienced before, I knew that I was in trouble. My heart felt like it was bursting with love and breaking with fear all at the same time and either way I looked at it I was in danger of literally loving this little guy to death.

Once the nurse placed him on my chest, cleaned him off, and then took him away to the warmer to wrap him up and snap this picture I was totally and completely smitten.

I also started feeling other things that I had never felt before. A fierce protection of my little boy that was almost crushing when the nurse took him from my arms.

In the picture I am looking at the nurse like “OMG you are totally going to break him. I do not trust you at all. Give him back. Give him back before I cry.”

In what world does it make sense for Life to give this kind of mom a special needs child? I couldn’t handle the thought of raising this little guy, who was completely normal.

Can you imagine the picture of me after I found out that Oli was blind?

Or maybe this picture explains completely why I was given a special needs child…

25 Reasons You Know You’re A Special Needs Parent

31 Jan

I recently read a post on the Scary Mommy blog entitled 25 reasons why you know you’re a parent.

I would to like to add a list of 25 reasons you know you’re a special needs parent:

1.You invite random strangers (new therapists) into your house and before they get there, tell your children to quickly throw their crap around the room so it doesn’t appear “too clean” because you don’t want the therapists to expect a clean house every time they visit.

2.Meeting a great therapist is like a 12 year old girl meeting a celebrity. There are tears, lots of hugs and phrases spoken like “you’re so cool”. You also make sure you to tell them multiple times throughout a session how amazing they are and you are thrilled to have finally met one.

3.Racing through the grocery store, hollering please stop biting my face, pushing a big stroller and a little cart, shoving gluten free snacks in your child’s hands, while you watch them slowly go from quiet whining to total combustion, still managing to remember to grab deodorant (since you’ve been out for two days and have been using your husbands), and NOT cry when the checkout lady insists on talking to you about her grandson and how well behaved he is.

4.Sitting in a doctor’s office for 3 hours at least a few times a month doesn’t seem abnormal at all and now you just remember to pack every single portable electronic device in your house, a picnic basket full of snacks and also a full meal because you never know when 3 hours may turn into 5 or 6.

5.When you have to wait anywhere else with your other kids they are always the best behaved.

6.The sentence “Her eye is crooked again” is not spoken by the sci-fi character in the TV.

7.The sentence “Her eye fell out” is not from the horror movie.

8.A diaper bag is required for at least 5 years. It’s probably the same bag purchased when your child was born.

9.The medicine cabinet in your house full of syringes, liquids, and pills does not belong to a drug addict or your 90 year old grandmother.

10.You have strange swinging contraptions hanging from the ceiling and huge jungle gym equipment in your living room.

11.You go to the gym not to get fit, but simply to get out of the house. Then spend the entire time you are there checking your Facebook and bursting into fits of crazed laughter because you have “escaped”.

12.You believe that all baby items should come super-sized so you don’t have to spend a gazillion dollars on special order items that are the same ones they sell at Walmart only bigger.

13.Driving an hour and a half for a 25 minute appointment does not seem like a waste of time.

14.An hour and a half drive is actually like a mini vacation.

15.You start to actually love driving because when your kids are crying you can say “Sorry can’t get to you. Mommy’s driving” and not feel bad.

16.You celebrate pooping on the potty and reward it with high fives, good jobs, kisses, and candy. (Oh wait. That was also my 2 year old)

17.You don’t even bat an eye anymore when you check out at the pharmacy and the bill is $400. You just smile sweetly at the cashier and say “Of course. Do you accept credit?”

18.The wrong look from a stranger in the direction of your child causes you to snort, snarl, and foam at the mouth. You have the world’s best stink eye.

19.Sometimes punching people in the face just makes sense to you.

20.If someone overheard your conversation with your husband while on a dinner date they would think you were from the CIA and speaking in code. blah blah… IEP. . . blah blah. . .ARD. . .blah blah… MMHR. . .blah blah. . . DARS. . .

21.LOL! That last one was a joke. You don’t go to restaurants!! And you definitely don’t go there with your husband!

22.Dates include wearing your best flannel pajamas, renting a movie on TV and falling asleep during the opening credits.

23.Poop on the walls is not an emergency.

24.You are somewhat proud of the title “that mom”.

25.You absolutely hate it when people ask you “what is your child’s diagnosis?” and are thinking of just handing out laminated business cards because it would just be so much easier than explaining it. And you forget how to spell the damn word half the time so having it written down would be nice. Plus they’d be handy in those time when someone has the nerve to look at your child wrong. While snarling, spitting and growling you could also hand them a business card.

Laughter

23 Jan

“The most wasted of all days is one without laughter.” -E.E. Cummings

So I couldn’t help but write a little note about my husband’s reaction to my last few posts. And then our subsequent laughter. Proving once again, you really can laugh at terribly sad things.

Seth was out when I wrote and published the last post. I couldn’t wait for him to get home so he could read it. This one even made me tear up. I’m not a big crier so I was shocked when I re-read the post and felt tears pooling in my eyes.

(How silly considering I wrote the thing!)

I was curious to see his reaction. He is a crier so I knew he probably would. (Sorry honey but, you know you are.) But I was surprised at our reaction afterwards. This is how it goes…

Seth reads the post. I am sitting there staring at his face as he reads it. I am trying not to be obvious about it so I am pretending to clean up the kitchen.

(Shhh. I’m sneaky like that.)

He finishes. Looks up at me with tears rolling down his face and says, “That’s horrible!”

For a second I’m offended. What? Then I realize he’s talking about that time in our life, not my writing.

I look at him with tears in my own eyes as that memory breaks the surface again and tries to taunt me. Reminding me of how incredibly sad and helpless I felt then.

It only stays for a moment though and then retreats back into the cave where I have sentenced it to live in the back of my mind. Those memories of complete sadness are not allowed out very often.

Then I look back up at Seth and our eyes meet. We both burst into uncontrollable laughter.

ME- “That sucked!”

SETH- “It did suck didn’t it!”

And then we laugh some more. Because that’s what we can do now. I never want to go back to that place of grief but, sometimes it’s a good reminder of how sweet the laughter can be.

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clotildajamcracker

The wacky stories of a crazy lady.

This is the place

visiting places where writers were born, lived, loved & are buried.

motherslittlesteps.co.uk/

Motherhood and Country-Coastal Living

My Dance in the Rain

The journey of my life, my path to redefine myself and a special little girl with Cri du Chat Syndrome and Primary Ciliary Dyskenisia who changed it all.

Prego and the Loon

Pregnant and Dealing With Domestic Violence

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