Tag Archives: growing

My life as mom.

12 May

When my son Kekoa was born in 2005, I became a mother for the first time. When my daughter Oli was born in 2007, I became a completely different kind of mother. I became a special needs mother. When my last daughter Ginger was born in 2010, I became a different mother again. Each child has changed me, made me grow, and taught me new things. Each child has made me the mother that I am today, but not the mother that I will be tomorrow. As each year passes, as each child gets a little older, as I in turn get a little older (boo), I learn. I learn and become a little more comfortable with this messy, unpredictable, smelly, funny, weird, magical thing we call motherhood.

When my son was first born, I was a wreck. Seriously. I panicked over everything. I was terrified that someone was going to breathe on him the wrong way and give him the plague. I was scared that someone would hold him the wrong way and his neck would snap off or they would drop him on his head. I was afraid that formula would make him less smart or that the wrong baby food would give him some kind of weird disease or give him explosive diarrhea.

When he was 2 months old I seriously thought that he might have some kind of syndrome. I studied him too long one night and my lack of sleep and new mother brain absolutely convinced me that something was wrong with his face. Didn’t his nose look a little too flat on top? Weren’t his eyes set too close together? Was his head supposed to be that big? My husband laughed at me and certified me exhausted. I was sent to bed and he looked normal to me again in the morning.

I worried that he slept too much or didn’t sleep enough. I worried about his clothes. I wanted him to have the most adorable new clothes and I worried that while I worked, my husband would dress him in mismatching outfits and wrong colored socks. I worried about him sleeping on his back. I worried about him sleeping on his tummy. Could I cover him up at night or would he smother to death? Was this the right kind of bottle or would it give him gas? Was this swing certifiably safe or would it be recalled in a month? Was I doing it right? Was I doing it wrong? And his manual was…where? Where was his manual? I would think, “This kid should’ve come with directions.” Then I would remember that I’m not so good with directions and then I would worry about THAT! I worried about everything. I was ridiculous. I was NEW!

And then I had Oli. Oh my god. THEN I had Oli!

I still worried about everything, but those worries changed. I worried about all of those other things and more! I worried that she wouldn’t live to see her first birthday and that I wouldn’t get to watch her grow up. I worried that she wouldn’t grow or eat well enough to thrive. I worried that blindness would handicap her in such a way that she would never enjoy her life fully. I worried that she would never walk or talk. I worried that she would never have any friends. I worried that she would never have a boyfriend, go to the prom, or get married. I worried that she would never get to know the joys of raising her own children. I worried that if she did have children, they would be affected by the same eye condition and also be blind. I worried that blindness would not be her only disability. I worried that there would be more.

And then I had Ginger. For the love of all the crying in the world…and then I had Ginger. She cried so much and I was so stressed out about having three children ages 4 and under that the only things I ever worried about with her was whether or not she had been fed and if her diaper was clean. I didn’t have time to worry about anything else. I didn’t have the energy either. She rarely got new clothes and often times, she wore the same clothes that she had slept in the night before. If she wasn’t crying, we were good. She cried all the time. Sooooo…we were not good very often. I still didn’t really worry much with Ginger. Maybe I had worried myself out?

Many of the worries that I had with Kekoa and Oli were valid as a new mother and as a new special needs mother. Many of them were classified as ABSURD, but many of them still stalk my brain at night. It seems that when the darkness falls, some of those old fears silently creep back into my mind. They try to keep me awake, pretending that I can predict the future and the outcome of what life holds for us. Then I wake up in the morning. When I wake up I remember again that life is a journey and an adventure and I don’t always need to know the destination. I only need to be present for the ride.

Motherhood is about changing, adapting, and growing. Old dreams may be lost, but new dreams are acquired. Old thoughts and ideas are discarded and new ones are developed and perfected. Things we worried about before are acknowledged as silly. Other things we worried about before still linger.

The point is…every mother worries. Regardless if you have a child with special needs or not. It’s a requirement for getting your motherhood license. You must worry about the most insane, ridiculous, irrelevant, nonsense matters. And you must worry about the reality and the responsibility of raising good people. We are all just trying to raise good little people and make sure that they grow up into respectable, responsible, productive members of society.

All of us just want to love our children and sometimes we just want to survive the day.

Because some days…mother’s just need to survive the day.

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Can You See Me? I’m Here In The Darkness. (Part 4)

24 Feb

I spent the last two days attending the Blind Cafe and then the 2013 TX Deaf-Blind Symposium. Because of these two events my perception of Oli and some preconceived notions of her abilities/disabilities have completely been swung around and turned on their heads.

Where I have focused a lot of my time on what she cannot do because of or what she will not do because of .I am now seeing exactly what she is capable of and what is possible if I give her the chance. Although I really felt like I had given her lots of opportunities to explore the world and chances to communicate, after talking with blind adults and listening to experts in the field, now I feel like. . . Holy shit! I still have been regarding her learning opportunities in terms of what I see as limitations because of her disabilities.

While I was sitting in the darkness at the cafe a striking realization came to me when the wait staff started answering questions. I hate to say that when I first see a person with a disability, I see a disability. I’m not supposed to see that right? Because my daughter has a disability? But I still do. I don’t like that about me and I really try not to. I realized that one of the things that was so wonderful about listening to the blind adults speak in the cafe was. . . I didn’t see a disability. I couldn’t! And it was great. All I heard were intelligent, funny, nice people speaking. And then I started thinking about what an advantage they have over all of the rest of us. They honestly get to know people in a fast, genuine, real way bypassing all of the visual judgemental nonsense that sighted people have.

Always aspiring to be one of those “good” people who doesn’t judge people by what they look like, what they’re wearing, or how clean they are (although I’ll bet blind people notice that one even quicker than me) I suddenly started thinking of Oli as. . .lucky. I stopped viewing blindness as something I would never want for her and although I still wish she wasn’t, I started looking at all of the good things about blindness. Like seeing people by way of her heart and judging them by the truth in their words and the honesty in their voices.

I had a moment when I was sitting in the dark, listening to the band play, that I was overcome by sadness. Silent tears poured down my face as I sat there thinking about how hard it was. Walking around not knowing where I was going, trying to find my food and not knowing what I was eating because nobody told me. Tasting food that I HATE and not knowing if I had a drink. Wanting to wipe off my hands and not being able to find my napkin. I felt helpless. I felt alone.

But as I sat there crying quietly so no one would know, I started to recognize that feeling. I remember spending a lot of my time feeling that exact same way in the first years of Oli’s life. Lost and alone, crying silently in the dark. I welcomed that feeling like an old friend and greeted her with open arms without even realizing who she is. Who she really is… is my own self pity. My own fear, ignorance, and judgement.

I opened my eyes, dried my tears and sat up straight in my chair.

NO! No more!

I will not allow this twisted friendship to continue! I will not welcome you into my heart! I will not pretend anymore that you will stay for a short visit and then let you live on my couch for years!

You Miss. . . are no longer allowed in my front door.

I am not helpless, weak, alone, unheard, unloved, or in this by myself. More importantly, this is not about me.

This is about Oli and she is none of those things either.

(Thank you for reading about my experience at the Blind Café! If you want to know more about it or want to know if it will be coming to a city near you go to www.theblindcafe.com The End.)

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