Tag Archives: faith

It makes me really sad mom.

9 Feb

I got the call that I am always terrified to get when I’m away from Oli.

“Shannon. Something is wrong with Oli. I think I need to call an ambulance.”

My heart fell to the floor and stayed there until she was wheeled into the ER on a stretcher and I could see her.

“What do you mean? What’s wrong?” I asked as my heart raced, but my mind cleared.

“Well she’s breathing really funny. Like holding her breath and I can’t keep her awake. Here. Listen.” My mom, who had been home with her while I took my other two kids to a horse vaulting stable, put the phone up to Oli’s lips.
I hear a strange grunting sound coming from my daughter.

“She’s been doing this for a while now and it’s getting worse. When she falls asleep it’s better, but as soon as she stirs she does it again.

“Mom. Listen. Lift up her shirt. Can you see her ribs or her sternum as she breathes? Does it look like she’s sucking in?”

My mom quickly checks. “No. No I don’t see that.”

“Okay good. What about her lips? Are they pink or do they look blue?”

“They’re really pale. I just don’t feel right about this. I feel like something is really wrong with her. She just keeps falling asleep.”

“Mom. Do you feel like you should call an ambulance?” I ask calmly. Going into more nurse mode at this point than mother mode.

“I’m not sure. Maybe. Something is wrong with her breathing.” She answers. I can hear the fear in her voice.

“Okay. If there is even a question that maybe you should, I need you to call. I am at least an hour away and by the time I get there to check her, things could have gone dramatically downhill. My phone is almost dead. I only have about 10% battery left. I’m going to call Seth and tell him to go home right now. I’ll have him call you on the way. He should be there in 10 minutes. Hang up and call 911.”

“Okay.”

I hang up and quickly call my husband.

No answer.

I call again.

No answer.

Oh my god. My phone is going dead.

I shoot him a quick text.

‘Call me NOW.’

He calls back immediately.

“Seth. I need to you to go home right now. Oli is not breathing right.”

“I’m on my way.” He replies in a calm voice.

I start to tell him that I’m leaving the stable now and that I’ll be about an hour…but he’s gone. I’m talking to dead air.

That morning Oli woke up happy. My mom and I had plans to take all three kids down to a stable in south Austin where their horse vaulting team has a Barn Buddies day once a month to raise money. The kids get to come down, learn some tricks on the barrels, and then get up on the horse to practice them with an experienced horse vaulter.

After Oli got up on Saturday morning she fell back asleep right after breakfast. I sent my mom a text and told her that maybe Oli shouldn’t go. I thought maybe she wasn’t feeling very well. My mom decided that she would just stay home with her and that I would take the other two kids and our dog. Shaka had service dog training right after the kids were done riding.

When I left, Oli was playing happily with her toys.

Kekoa and Ginger had an awesome time on the horses. It was really great because they always watch Oli ride at hippotherapy, but never get to ride themselves.

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That morning of fun quickly turned into a nightmare.

This was not Oli’s first ambulance ride.

Not even her second.

Her first executive ride to the hospital was one of the absolute worst days of my life.

October 4, 2011 is a day I will never, ever forget. Never.

That morning I woke up next to Oli violently convulsing and gasping for breath. She ended up being intubated with a machine breathing for her for two days.

The next ride was August 26, 2012.

And the last was on Saturday February 7, 2014.

I’d like to say that this will be her last, but I know that it might not be.

Her seizures, any person’s seizures, are no joke. I know that lots of kids have them. Some have hundreds a day. Some are lucky like Oli and only have them once in a while.

It’s really all about perspective. I don’t know anything but what I know about Oli. Her journey is no more or less than anyone else’s. We only know the life we live so it’s important not to minimize or over exaggerate something that we have no experience in.

I get really uncomfortable when I meet someone and they say “I just don’t know how you do it?! I could never do what you do!”

Yes you could. Yes you would.

I find myself thinking those same things though when talking with my friend who has a daughter who literally can have 100 seizures per day.

How does she get through it? How would I?

But I don’t have to worry about that because that’s not our life. I can talk with her about it. I can tell her how extremely terrified I was to get that call. I can tell her how Oli wasn’t breathing well and how awful it was because I’m sure she had more than one seizure yesterday. Like maybe 3 or 4 or 5. (I don’t know because they were seizures that we couldn’t see.)

And you know what she says? Not “Well that’s NOTHING! You should be grateful it was only a couple. My daughter…” Blah blah blah.

Nope. She doesn’t say any of those things.

She says “Wow! How scary! Do you need anything? Do you want to talk about it? How can I help you get through this?”

She validates my reality.

She doesn’t compare it.

That is powerful.
So incredible powerful.

I hear people compare themselves and their struggles to other families all the time.
Why?
Why are we judging when we should be supporting?

I’m so lucky to have so many incredible families in my life who do just that.
They support Oli. They support me. They support my kids and my husband.

We desperately need support because scenarios like the one we had on Saturday, do not leave a family unscathed.

The words I spoke to my children in the van as we left the stable, will not soon be forgotten.

Especially by my 8 year old son.

“What’s wrong mom? Why aren’t we going to take Shaka to training?”

“Your sister is having trouble breathing and is on her way to the hospital. We need to go there now.”

He immediately becomes quiet.

My three year old, Ginger, does the exact opposite. She has a million questions.

“What do you mean? What is she doing? I’m hungry. Can we stop for lunch? Can I have a snack? Do you have any juice? Are we going to see Grandma now? Are we going to Shaka’s training? Where’s Oli? Where is she going? Where are we going again?”

Oh. My. God. Ginger.

Ginger is either the best person to have with you in a crisis or the absolute worst.

I’m leaning towards the worst. 🙂

It was good because she was distracting me with her 5 billion questions and it was frustrating because I was trying to figure out where I was going, who was going to take the dog, which hospital they were taking her to? Did my husband get home? Are they on their way? When was Ginger going to STOP TALKING!

I got a hold of my friend, Cat, who just happened to be at the stable with me.

“Cat. I need you to come get the dog. Oli is being taken to the hospital by ambulance. They’re taking her to Dell Children’s.” I speak rapidly into the phone.

“I’m on my way.”

Man I have some good friends and family.

I had so many people texting and messaging me, offering kind words, support, and offers to watch my other two kids. It was very very humbling to realize how many people were willing to drop what they were doing and help.

Once we got to the hospital Kekoa was even quieter and Ginger even more inquisitive.

Fortunately Cat got there as soon as I did and took the two kids before Oli was wheeled into the room.

We didn’t know what to expect, but I knew I didn’t want my kids to see her surrounded by hospital staff, talking, asking questions, and working on Oli.

My son has already seen too much in his short 8 years.

Once Oli got there she was breathing better. She was doing some breath holding off and on, but didn’t seem to be in distress. She definitely wasn’t herself. She was constantly falling asleep and wasn’t really moving at all.
If you know Oli, this is completely out of character. She is always going.

After we had been there a little while Cat asked if we could bring the kids in. Just so they could see that she was okay.

Unfortunately as soon as they got there a team came in to start her IV. My poor Kekoa was so flustered that when Cat escorted him back out of the room he grabbed my purse and tried to walk off with it.

After that, they didn’t come back in.

I can’t even begin to imagine what he must have been going through. I know what I was going through and it was awful. And I knew what was going on! He only knows that one of the times his sister took an ambulance ride, she almost didn’t make it back home.

Oli stayed at the hospital for about 9 hours. They ran a bunch of tests and then did an EEG.

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By the time they did it she was mostly back to herself. She was worn out and acting sick, she had been running a fever too, but she was aware of what was going on and awake. Once the EEG came back normal at 11 pm they said that, if we were comfortable, we could take her home.

We opted to go home.

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Oli was more than happy to be sprung from the hospital.

The verdict was seizure activity brought on by… we don’t know. A little virus maybe.

Seth had taken the kids to another friends house in the afternoon and then my mom went and picked them up so they could stay with her for the night.

Shaka stayed with Cat and his girlfriend Dubi.

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Yeah. He didn’t miss us at all. He is in love.

This morning my mom said that Kekoa was very tearful at her house.

We finally got him to talk about it when he came home.

“It makes me really sad mom.” He admits in a quiet voice.

He also said that he was really scared for Oli. Really scared.

Me too buddy. Me too.

It’s important that I never ever minimize his feelings.

I need to never compare, judge, or make him feel like he has to feel any other way, than the way he does.

As important as it is to me to have my friends and family validate how I feel…it is more important to me

that I validate my son’s.

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What if she never speaks?

20 Jul

As I stood in the hallway, talking and listening to this Italian mother speak about her 14 year old, blind, autistic daughter Eliza, one thought kept racing relentlessly through my mind. I had one question that I needed to ask this mom about the daughter that looked, and acted so much like my own. I wanted a tiny glimpse into the future of this Italian world that seemed to mirror my own.

“Does your daughter speak now?” I asked her quietly, trying to hide the desperation from my voice.

“No. No she doesn’t.” She replied, quite clearly seeing the pain seep into my eyes.

In that moment, in those brief few seconds that passed between us, the reality of what we both were feeling, the dreams that we had for our girls, were spoken without any words from our lips. They were spoken between the souls of one heartbroken mother to another.

She knew that when she reveled that truth and her reality to me, that she was giving me an answer that I didn’t want to hear.

I didn’t want to hear it.

Do you know what I wanted to hear? Of course you do.

I wanted to hear that her daughter had learned to talk. I wanted to hear that after years of silence, 14 years of silence…that she could now talk about what was going through her mind.

I desperately wanted to hear that one day my daughter would learn how to talk to me.

But that wasn’t what had happened.

As she began telling me the story of her daughter’s communication struggles, I began to feel more and more uncomfortable. I began to feel more and more angry. I began to see more and more similarities between our children.

And I didn’t like what I heard.

Her daughter had also learned to talk when she was 2. She had also stopped when she was 3. She had started speaking again right about the age that Oli is now…

And then she stopped.

She just simply quit speaking.

One day it was there, and the next day it just wasn’t.

Poof.

BOOM!

There it was.

One of my biggest fears had once again been dropped at my feet.

When Oli began speaking again a few months ago I couldn’t believe it. After 3 long years of complete silence I couldn’t believe my ears when she started to say a few words again. With every new word she spoke the fear of what she wouldn’t say the next day crept in the back of my mind. The questions of “What if she doesn’t talk today?” came with each morning sunrise. The fear of “Will today be the last day that I hear her speak?” came with each nightfall.

And here stood this mother telling me that all of my fears that I so successfully banished to the back of mind, might one day come true.

What now? What do I do with this information?

After a few days of living within that fear and those terrible alternate realities that my mind likes to create; the ones where everything goes wrong and I am helpless again struggling against a monster that I could never hope to defeat, I realized that I was projecting a future upon Oli that I have no control over. I was sentencing her to a life of silence without any knowledge or proof that this is what would happen. I was letting myself believe once again in a hopeless situation that has absolutely no reason to be hopeless.

Oli is not Eliza. Oli is Oli.

What she will or won’t do has nothing to do with what another child has or has not done. Even though that other child is so similar to her. She still is an individual. One capable of fulfilling any potential, achieving any goal and overcoming any obstacle that lies before her.

Oli is Oli.

I have said it before, she will do what she will do regardless of how much time I spend worrying about it. Regardless of how much time I spend crying over it.

So I took my own advice.

I spoke the words to myself that I have spoken to other parents about their children.

As her mother, one of my most important jobs is to never stop believing in her.

If she was autistic…where did that leave me?

7 Jun

When Oli was two years old, a few drastic changes took place in her life. We moved 1500 miles away. We moved away from one of her grandmas, her aunties, her cousins, and the only house she ever knew. We moved away from her sister.

At the time that we moved, Oli was still taking. On the drive down she repeated the words “up” and “out” over and over and over. It was a looooong drive. I remember that we stopped for breakfast one morning on the second day. My mom asked her what she wanted for breakfast. Oli answered “eggs” and then clapped enthusiastically. My girl loves eggs. She also said “Mom. Dad. Grandma. Koa. Milk. Juice. Eat. Hi. Bye.” Those are just a few.

Six months after we got to Texas, I had another baby. By this point her speech had already started to decline. Ginger was born in March 2010 and by September, Oli had completely stopped speaking.

She did NOT do well when Ginger was born. None of us did. Ginger cried all the time, day and night for 4 months straight. I couldn’t put her down. Ever. She was either eating or crying. She rarely slept. Oli was stressed out and hated the baby. If she heard Ginger near her she would scrunch up her face and push her away. If I tried to get her to hold the baby she would cry. She didn’t understand what she was or why she was so loud.

Oli started stimming more and more. She stopped repeating simple words and didn’t use the words that had been frequent in her vocabulary six months prior.

By Christmas of that year I knew that something had happened. Something else was wrong that had caused her to stop talking. Was it the stress of the move and the birth of her sister? Or was it something else?

I knew that I couldn’t just take her to a regular doctor to evaluate her. Blindness complicated the diagnosis and I didn’t want them to misdiagnose her or misinterpret her behaviors (blindisms) as autistic behaviors because in blind kids they are not.
Most kids born blind have a lot of the same self-stimulatory behaviors that autistic kids have. They have a lot of the same sensory issues too.

Oli constantly shakes her head back and forth. Continually. All day long. (Think Stevie Wonder.) She has done this since she was a year old. She started flapping her hands around 2 years old. She loves to spin and swing and she’ll rock violently back and forth when she’s mad. She’s always seeking more and more input because she is missing the main way that human beings get their information. Through our sight. She puts everything in her mouth. Blind children typically go through a longer oral stage because of the reason I stated above. This is just one more way to get information if you can’t see it.

None of those things set off any alarm bells though. I knew that was just her blindness.

What DID set my heart racing and began to fill it with unspeakable dread and fear? What one thing lead me to question what was wrong with her?

Why did she stop speaking?

It felt like one day she was talking and the next day she just wasn’t.

What would cause this to happen?

One terrifying word came into my mind.

Autism.

I called the research center for anophthalmic and microphthalmic children. The Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. I made her an appointment for an evaluation. They had developed a specific clinic staffed with experts on blindness to determine if our kiddos really were autistic or if their behaviors and characteristics were simply the results of being born blind. Many of our kids were receiving the diagnosis of autism when they weren’t and many of them were not being given the label when they were. That team was supposed to be able to clarify and correct the appropriate clinical diagnosis.

So I flew her to Pennsylvania and asked them the million dollar question.

Was my baby girl autistic?

During the months leading up to that evaluation I began to question, pray, bargain, and plead with a God that I had started to lose faith in. I began to cry and scream at him “You made her blind! You made her physically and developmentally delayed! Don’t make her autistic too! Please! I will do anything! ANYTHNG! Don’t make my baby autistic too!”

I laid in bed at night questioning my very life and existence. I began asking questions that I would never receive answers to.

I wondered why He would do this to her? Why would He do this to me?
Why had my life been so easy before? Why had it become so hard?
When was my nightmare going to be over? When was I going to wake up?
The more I prayed and pleaded…the farther away I drifted.
The more questions I asked…the less answers I received.

I flew Oli to Philadelphia with a heavy heart, a stomach full of knots, and an empty soul.

Where was my God? Would He answer my prayers?

I feared that I already knew the answer to those questions.

Where did that leave me now?

A Phone Call I Won’t Forget

8 Mar

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On Saturday May 9, 2009 I got one of the few phone calls that I will never forget. How do I remember the specific date? Because we were celebrating Oli’s 2nd birthday.

We were having some family and friends over to the house to celebrate Oli’s special day. We were just getting ready for everyone to arrive when my cell phone rang.

“Hello?” I didn’t recognize the number on the display.

“Hi. My name is Bridget. I got your number from Tanya from the Albert Einstein Medical Center. I’m 22 weeks pregnant with my first child and I was recently told that they suspect that she has microphthalmia. I know you have a daughter with micro and I just had some questions and wanted to talk.”

It seemed like all of the breath was expelled from my lungs in one quick whoosh. My heart dropped to my stomach and the moment became imprinted in my memory. This woman was going to have a baby girl just like my Oli. I was one of the first people she reached out to. I knew how terrifying those first few weeks were when Oli was born. I remember searching for just one person who knew what I was going through. I found that one person and I still remember my phone call with her. Now I got to be that person. I got to offer another mother the same compassion and understanding that was offered to me.

I wished I could reach right through the phone and wrap my arms around this stranger.

“Where are you?” I asked.

“We’re just outside Austin, TX.” She answered.

Now, I was stilling living in Pahrump, NV at this time. Seth and I hadn’t even discussed moving yet. Well…we had discussed it, but we didn’t know where we were moving to yet.

Fate, strange coincidence? I don’t know. I find it eerie that we ended up moving about an hour away from Bridget just a little over 5 months later. We’re still friends, although she has since moved away to be closer to her family in St. Louis, MO.

“I’m so glad that you called me! I would love to talk with you about Oli and help you in any way I can.”

I remember carrying the phone into my bedroom, mouthing “another A/M (anophthalmia/microphthalmia) mom to my husband, and closing the door. I sat on my bed and asked Bridget to tell me her story. How she found out, what she knew about micro, and most importantly, how she was feeling. I remember she sounded scared, lost, and overwhelmed. But, she had something in her voice that I had been missing. Something that I pretended to have, but always fell short of achieving.

She had faith in her voice.

A lot of babies born with microphthalmia have some sort of vision. If the eyes are not too underdeveloped they may have some usable vision or light perception. Sometimes only one eye is affected and the other eye is normal. If the micro is severe enough, then the kids don’t usually have any sight and sometimes even when the micro eyes are not severe, there is no vision because other structures are involved. Like underdeveloped optic nerves. Basically….one just never knows until the babies show us that they can see or not. Anophthalmia means the eye is missing completely. This also can affect only one eye, the other being normal, or it can happen in both eyes. You would think that the kids with bilateral anophthalmia would not have any vision at all. You would think that they would be 100% blind because, well…because they are missing their eyes. Not true. I have heard of some kids with anophthalmia in both eyes and these children display signs of having light perception. You just never, ever know. You cannot say with any certainty that a baby is blind until they absolutely prove to you that they are.

When Bridget went in for a routine ultrasound the tech noticed that her baby’s eyes seemed small. Upon further testing/measuring the eye sockets they realized that they were really small. Although, no one knew the extent of the underdeveloped eye sockets. They wouldn’t know for sure until her baby was born.

For a long time after Oli was born I would think about what it would have been like if I had known about Oli’s eyes before she was born. Most people don’t know until birth because eye measurement just isn’t something they do with a routine ultrasound. They only do it if the tech notices that the baby’s eyes look small. I can make arguments about which would have been better for me, knowing or not knowing.

On one hand, I’m glad that I didn’t know because I got to enjoy my pregnancy. As much as I can enjoy being pregnant, which is not very much. I didn’t dread her delivery or have to worry about what would happen afterwards. For people like me, this was a very good thing. My mind has a hard time staying in today as well as suffering from constant abuse from my nemesis, Gertrude. That little old lady would have made my life a living hell in the months before her birth. If I would have known I would have been plagued by a constant rush of bad scenarios and terrible outcomes running through my head.

On the other hand, if I would have known, maybe I would have been better prepared. Maybe I could have talked to another A/M mom before she was born. Maybe it would have helped. Maybe not? Maybe I would have been paralyzed with fear and raging pregnancy hormones. Maybe….

Now it doesn’t really matter. Not knowing is just part of my story.

I talked with Bridget for a long time that warm day in May. I tried not to let my sadness or my fear for her creep into my voice that day. I tried to just listen and offer her whatever I had that might give her some peace. The truth is…Bridget already had it. Although I’m sure that she was scared, she already had a sense of peace about her because Bridget had faith in something bigger. Faith that her baby would be born exactly as God had intended and she knew that her baby would be well taken care of.

Her baby girl was born in September 2009. She has bilateral anophthalmia. She is totally blind.

And she perfectly named her baby….Faith.

If you want to read more about Bridget and her sweet Faith go to www.superbabyfaith.com

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