Tag Archives: expectations

Special needs parenting or nauseating roller coaster ride?

11 Oct

I wanted to write something for the people who may have babies and are just beginning to fall, head first, into this world of special needs parenting.

If you are like me, you are most definitely feeling the bounds of gravity as you plunge down screaming towards an end, a ground that seems impossibly far away. You’re racing towards a bottom that you cannot see, you cannot feel, and you believe you may never reach the end.

Let me assure you that you will.

Oh yes.

That end, that bottom, that ground is there.

BAM!! CRASH!! BANG!!

stock-vector-bang-crash-54901102

Or maybe you’ll land a bit more softly.

Soft_Landing_by_Domo__Kun

Or maybe you’ll even receive a warning prior to landing.

SoftLanding-300x203
(Where was this sign when I was approaching?)

There will be a moment, a second, an hour, a day, a week, a month… I cannot say how it will happen for you…where everything will begin to smooth out. It will begin to even out. You will start to once again feel comfortable in your own skin again.

Or you will smack your face on a rock buried in the mud at the bottom.

This was me.

For me it happened in an instant.

A head jarring, face slamming, body crunching SMACK onto the bottom.

I cruised along downward in misery, in self-pity, in blame, regret, remorse, grief, sorrow…for years before a light bulb went off in my head like a giant flashing beacon begging me to notice it. It had been there all along. Drawing me down. Steadily building momentum and pummeling towards the forefront of my brain waiting for the right moment to come out and slam me into that pit.

Hello?!! Here is your awakening! Here is the answer that you’ve been waiting for!

THIS, MY FRIEND, IS THE END.

STOP FEELING SORRY FOR YOURSELF! STOP FEELING SORRY FOR HER!
SHE IS WHO SHE IS.
NO MORE.
NO LESS.
JUST BELIEVE IN HER.

And that was it. That was all I needed to “get over” the sadness. I was able to move on at that point.

All of the self hatred, self pity, sadness…it all just went away.

It seems pretty simple.

Looking back at it, it seems like someone along the way should have just told me that. They should have been able to say “just get over it”. “Just accept her.”

In truth… they did.
Lots of people did.

But hearing the words with my ears and believing them in my heart are two totally different concepts. I heard lots of people telling me how to go about moving on from this thing that had happened to me.

I heard lots of people tell me how they had dealt with something similar. How they had moved on from it.
I listened and listened. I prayed. I pleaded. I just did not feel it.

Until I did.

Until I understood with all of my heart that this was really not something that had happened to ME.
Until I threw away all of my expectations and just expected her to be the very best that she could be.

Which may not make sense to you at all, but it makes perfect sense to me.

How can I not have expectations for my child?

This is how.

I expect nothing at all of her and I also expect everything.
I expect that she will do everything, nothing at all like anybody else in the world.
I expect that she will do nothing but everything that she can do.
I expect that she will do and be who she is and I love her for that.

It’s just a different perspective. A different way of viewing life and the world in general.

Before she was born I had all of these dreams, all of these visions, of how we would be, how we would exist in the world as mother and daughter.

After she was born I mourned the loss of THOSE dreams.

I didn’t realize that I could come up with NEW dreams.

I didn’t know that I was able to re-create this new life however I wanted to.

I didn’t know what a blessing and a gift Oli truly was to me.

Once I began to realize all of these things my whole life began to change.

I wouldn’t want it any other way now.

So.

If you’re just beginning this terribly bumpy, painful, twisting, and nauseating roller coaster ride of special needs parenting I want you to know, it gets better.

I promise you. It gets better.

You may have to be patient. You may have to hang on, white knuckling your life for a little while before it does. But it gets easier.

People used to tell me “time heals all” and I thought they were full of B.S.
I never thought that it would get easier for me.

You know what?

I was wrong.

It did get better and it continues to get better all the time.

I just have to leave those expectations and pre-conceived notions of how I THINK it should be, at the door.
I just have to live my life loving my Oli however she is.

Or…

Maybe it will be totally and completely different for you.
Maybe you’ll be given a diagnosis and be fine with it from the start.
I’m not trying to speak for the whole world here. I’m just trying to give someone else hope that if they’re feeling like I felt in the beginning, it will get better.
Besides…what do I know?
Some days I’m still trying to figure this whole thing out.

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But she might…

8 May
As soon as my tires hit the gravel and I pull into R.O.C.K where Oli rides her horse, she gets THIS look on her face. She knows exactly where we are and what is about to happen. Then I say, "Oli we're HERE!!! It's time to ride your horse!" And she starts frantically clapping and yelling. She knows. No one can tell me that she doesn't understand. Just look at her face. I KNOW she knows.

As soon as my tires hit the gravel and I pull into R.O.C.K where Oli rides her horse, she gets THIS look on her face. She knows exactly where we are and what is about to happen. Then I say, “Oli we’re HERE!!! It’s time to ride your horse!” And she starts frantically clapping and yelling. She knows. No one can tell me that she doesn’t understand. Just look at her face. I KNOW she knows.

I posted this picture on my facebook page today. I posted it to show an example of what one of Oli’s expressions look like. This is an expression of “I know what is happening and I’m going to sit really quietly for a second and then I’m going to get really excited because I love what we’re about to do”. She has LOTS of these looks.

Some people have told me throughout her life that because she has an intellectual disability, is delayed and has autism, she doesn’t understand. That she couldn’t possibly understand because she doesn’t speak and because her cognitive development is delayed. We know that she is missing some of her genes off of her 14th chromosome. We know that this has affected her development and her learning. We know because she has done everything later than everyone else. We know that. I know that.

I know that despite being told that she may never walk independently, eat independently, have anticipation of events, be aware of her surroundings, have a sense of humor, the ability to laugh and to love, be funny, be brave, show strength and determination, cry, be sad, be mad, get frustrated… she has. I know that she has proved those people wrong every single time. And I know that she DOES understand. She does. I know because I KNOW her. Sometimes I feel like I know her better than I know myself. For whatever reason, she just can’t tell me what she understands with words.

I know that I may NOT know exactly what she is capable of in the future, but that I will ALWAYS give her a chance.

I know that I will ALWAYS believe in her.

ALWAYS.

That’s my job as her mother.

To believe in her despite all the odds, the challenges, the setbacks, the regression, the frustration and tears. Despite text books that tell me what she will or won’t do. Despite well educated doctor’s opinions and the opinions of the rest of the world. I will believe in her. I will never expect her to do less than her very best and I will never accept the words “She will never…”.

Because she might.

Because she probably will.

And even if she doesn’t do something or say something, I will go to my grave believing that it is still possible.

Some may call that naïve or say that I’m in denial. I’m not. I know that there is always the possibility that she will never move out, go to college, or get married.

But she might…

I will never ever be able to look into her sweet face and not see the sky as the limit. I will never take anyone else’s opinion on what she will or won’t do as fact. Oli will have to prove it to me. And even then, I will still push her. I will push her to have confidence and believe in herself. To set goals and achieve them. I will push her to develop her own sense of identity and to be kind. To love other people and to be respectful. To be understanding and to be grateful for what she has. To live and to laugh and to never look back. To view past mistakes as learning opportunities and chances to grow. To greet each day with optimism, and with a smile on her face, and to act better than she feels. To know that every day will not be perfect, but that’s okay. I want to push her to do her best with what she has and to be proud of who she is. I want her to be prideful instead of pitiful. I never want the world to take pity on her and I never want her to feel like she deserves it when they do.
Because they will.

She may never be able to do these things.

But she might…

One Mother’s Expectations

14 Mar

“I thought that one day I would just wake up and have all of the answers. What I have found is that the answers I get, rarely have anything to do with the questions I ask.”

It was a warm day in June 2009 and I was sitting on our cream colored leather couch in the living room. I’m sure there was a cartoon on the TV that I had forgotten to turn off when my kids laid down for a nap. I was alone, which for some reason, I usually am when I get bad news. My husband was at work.

The phone rang and I glanced down at the caller ID.

Unknown.

I normally don’t answer calls labeled unknown and let them go to voicemail, but on that particular afternoon I answered it.

Unknown.

That is where I was sitting in the moments before I took that call. I didn’t know what Oli “had”. I didn’t know why. I didn’t have any answers. Why had her eyes not developed in utero? What was wrong with her? Why was she so different from other children her age? Why was she 2 years old and not walking or talking yet?

At that point in her life, I needed to know why.

I thought that if I knew why, I could help her better. I thought that if I knew why, then I wouldn’t be so angry with the world. If I finally got an explanation as to what had happened, then I could come to terms with the whole mess that had become my emotional prison.

I found out why, on a warm day in June when my phone rang and I answered a call from the Albert Einstein Medical Center. They were calling to tell me the results of Oli’s genetic testing.

I found out why it happened, but I did not find out why it happened to her. Which is really what I wanted to know all along.

Why did it happen to my family? Why us? Why did fate choose my sweet, innocent, beautiful little girl to bestow such a big obstacle on. A big difference. A hardship.

Why?

You see, for a long time I thought that this was some kind of punishment. I couldn’t understand why this happened to me. To my baby. I was a good person. I never hurt anyone intentionally. I had a good life. A happy life. I grew up with a great family. I had friends, went to college, had a job. I was grateful for my life and was just going along trying to be the best person that I could be.

And then…the ground fell out from beneath my feet.

I thought it was all happening to me and my family. It was my son and my husband who were affected by this.


I
took on ALL of the responsibility of the health and happiness of my little family because I was the wife. I was the mother. I was supposed to protect them, keep them safe and ensure their happiness.

And then Oli was born.

She was born and I wasn’t sure that I could do any of it anymore.

If I could not stop, prevent, change, or fix what had happened to this little person that I had brought into the world, then I could not stop, prevent, change, or fix what happened to any of them. That realization hit me like a 2 ton steel truck, right smack dab in the middle of my forehead.

When I realized that…I began to react and operate by my fear.

Fear of this big, scary world that had walked into my hospital room on another warm day in May, 2 years previously. That unknown world walked right in, handed me a big pile of crap called unmet expectations and promptly walked right back out of that room.

Oli wasn’t what I had expected. She didn’t fit into my box. The box that was supposed to hold my perfect little life. No matter how hard I tried to cram that square peg into that round hole, she would. not. fit.

When I answered that unknown phone call, I still had expectations. I expected to hear that she had SOX2. Something that lots of other kids had. This particular gene deletion is responsible for the majority of microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

You know what I heard instead?

I heard that she did NOT have SOX2. I heard that she had something else. Something that was not very well known or very common.

She had OTX2.

A gene called OTX2 was deleted from her 14th chromosome and caused her eyes not to develop.

They didn’t know a whole lot about OTX2. When they diagnosed Oli she was one of only 15 kids in the world known to have this deletion.

I expected to finally have an answer, a plan. I expected to find out her diagnosis and then hear, “She will do this at this time. Talk at this age. Walk at this age. Have this ailment, but never suffer from this one. She will go to college. She will get married. She will wear a pink dress to the prom.”

These are the things I wanted to hear when I got that phone call. I thought that I would finally have answers. Real answers. A plan. When I got the diagnosis, I expected a map for the rest of her life to be laid out during that phone call.

What I got instead was….we don’t know?

We don’t know what her future will look like. We don’t know when she will walk or talk. Or if she will at all. We don’t know if she will go to college, ever have a boyfriend or get married. We don’t know if she will ever even be able to live on her own. We just don’t know.

My expectations, the ones that I had been relying on this whole time, were shattered like a mirror when I got that diagnosis. Her future, reflected in that piece of glass that I had been focusing on for 2 years, came crashing down around my feet.

Now I had a diagnosis, but I was no closer to any answers. No one could tell me how to fix it for her or what I needed to do as her mother, to make her fit into this life. Because no one knew what this life would look like for Oli.

I hung up the phone and gazed out of the window towards the mountains in the distance. Tears freely rolled down my cheeks and I made no attempt to wipe them away.

Now I knew what had happened, but I realized right at that moment, that I would never know why.

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