Archive | November, 2013

It’s a beautiful life.

20 Nov

When Oli was born my son Kekoa was only 17 months old. He had not even spent a year and a half in this life. On this earth. He was so incredibly young that I was still getting to know his little personality. I was trying to figure out what kind of person, what kind of man, he would grow into.

What kind of grooves would this little boy fall into after having a sister born with significant disabilities?
Would he stay locked into hers? Would he be able to find his way out? Would he be able to tread his own path, defining his own grooves? Would he be able to define himself and to find his own identity or would he continually be forced to follow along behind her?

Would I force him to follow along behind her?

Would he be mad at ME? Would he resent ME for the events in his life that were about to take place?
Would he resent HER for being born the way that she was?

As I sat on the corner of the tub, bathing my 17 month old little boy, I asked myself all of those questions. I cried over all of the possible answers that lay before me.

I cried for the little boy that I had promised to do everything for. I cried over the fact that I had somehow unintentionally just made his life so much harder. I cried because I was not going to be able to fix this for him. I was not going to be able to make this easy.

When she was born I never even considered the possibility that her birth could be the best thing that would ever happen to my family. I couldn’t even dream of recognizing the positive outcomes because I was so drawn into the pity parties and the negativity. I couldn’t stop feeling sorry for myself long enough to see the beautiful forest from the trees. I was stuck in an outcropping of horribly ugly, brown, leafless, dark, gnarly, trees. I hated those stinking trees.

As life moved on…

As I moved on…

As the world moved on… I began wondering what kind of person this experience would mold my son into. I began realizing that we had a unique opportunity to view our daily life as a constant lesson to learn about humanity. The good and the bad.

I learned and began to teach my son how to respond rather than react to people and situations that might not always be positive. I learned and then taught my son compassion and understanding rather than anger and resentment.

We talked about WHY people sometimes respond the way that they do to Oli. We talked about HOW we could and should respond when people are mean. We talked about how most people just don’t see the world the way that we do. We talked about how people are generally good and that sometimes they just don’t understand and are curious, but might not know how to ask about her condition.

We talked about a lot of things. We still talk about a lot of things.

Kekoa is 8 years old now. We talk like we’ve always talked, but now I try to get him to tell me how he feels about things. I try to get him to tell me how it makes him feel if someone is mean to his sister, but it’s hard.

He’s only 8.

Mostly he just says that it makes him sad. He says that he wished people understood her better. He wishes that people knew that she was just like them, but unable to speak or to see. He says that he wishes that they would consider her feelings when they were mean and not treat her like she doesn’t understand.

I wish that too Kekoa…

So we talk about those feelings and the actions that we can take to make it better.

I never really know how much he understands when I try to help him work through these things. I never know what he does with these talks and these experiences when he walks out of my front door in the morning and heads off to school.

Until now.

The mom of one of the girls in Kekoa’s school emailed me this morning to tell me a story about my sweet boy.

She said that her daughter Rachel, was being picked on by some boys at recess earlier this week. Her daughter told her that Kekoa had stood by her, comforting her, and helped her to reach a teacher who could help. Rachel told her mother later “Kekoa knows how to treat girls because he has sisters.”

Because he has sisters.

Because he has Oli.

Really that’s what it comes down to.

He has learned such compassion, such respect, such infinite wisdom because he has Oli to teach him.

He has a sister who has never looked into his eyes, never spoken his name, never uttered a sentence, but has taught him to be an incredible human being.

She is teaching him how to become a wonderful man.

I can see how beautiful my trees are now.

I can look my son in the eyes and never feel remorse or sadness about the way our life has turned out.

I can look at him and see the amazing gift that Oli has given all of us.

She has made every single one of us into a better person and has allowed us to live a life that I never even would have imagined.

It’s a beautiful life.

Advertisements

THE MOTHER OF ALL MELTDOWNS- Virtual Blog Tour

7 Nov

1381903_454435804667668_154638824_n

I recently had the honor, and I do mean honor, of being selected to participate in The Mother of all Meltdowns virtual blog tour. (Click on the title to purchase the book on Amazon.) Author Crystal Ponti has joined forces with 30 other fantastic, well known bloggers to recount their most memorable mother meltdown moments. If you’re a mom, if you’re a friend of a mom, a dad, if you are the child of a mom…you NEED to read this book. I found myself so totally absorbed within the first few minutes of starting it that I was surprised when my 3 year old daughter suddenly stuck her nose in front of my Tab, looking up at me with concern on her face, and asked why there were tears in my eyes? “Are you crying mommy? Why are you laughing and crying mommy?” She was completely confused. “Just reading a good story Ginger.” “A good story” is a total understatement. It was like these women had wandered, unbeknownst to me, into the confines of my head. Like they had been sitting front and center to the stage that had held some of my meltdowns. They had been where I had been. Of course, my 3 year old wouldn’t understand all of THAT. I couldn’t tell her “Well Ginger, see you kids drive mommy crazy sometimes and sometimes all you can do is sit back and hysterically laugh to the point of tears at the fact that you are not the only one being slowly driven to insanity some days.” “A good story” was the short and sweet answer. Satisfied, she wandered away and I was left alone for 20 more minutes to read a few more chapters. In my opinion, if you can laugh and cry within the first few pages of a book? You have gotten all of your moneys worth and more. There is no such thing as the perfect mom. Some days our houses are messy, our dinners are over cooked, okay… burned…I was trying to be nice there, our clothes are pj’s, and the laundry may be rewashed 3 times before making it into the dryer. Some days…mothers have meltdowns. But no matter what, our children are always loved.

As part of the virtual blog tour some of the authors have complied a list of Q & A’s for their readers.

What color is a meltdown?

“Black…by the time I am in a full blown meltdown mode, I feel the depths of despair. I feel like I just can’t fix it.” ~ Michelle Nahom, A Dish of Daily Life

“Clear. Like the color of vodka.” ~ Danielle Herzog, Martinis and Minivans

“I would say that depends on the nature of the meltdown. If it is an angry meltdown, it would be bright red. If it is a sad meltdown, then deep blue. Sometimes, there is even a meltdown born from panic. That one would be neon green.” ~ Lisa Witherspoon, The Golden Spoons

What comes to mind when you hear the word ‘meltdown’?

“Puddles…big puddles of kids (or moms) on the floor. You have to be very careful about stepping around the meltdown or you might get caught up in it. Kinda like quicksand, I guess.” ~ Rabia Lieber, The Liebers

“Someone curled up in the fetal position hiding in a corner. Or so I’ve heard.” ~ Jennifer Barbour, Another Jennifer
“Yelling and crying and ending up in a big heap of someone that you don’t recognize as yourself.” ~ AnnMarie Gubenko, Tidbits from the Queen of Chaos

What was your story about?

“My story was about the holiday havoc that went down in history. My son was sick, but we brought him to my parents’ house to celebrate Christmas anyway. Little did we know that we were about to set off a massive family flu pandemic. I was so stressed out from taking care of everyone that I ended up fainting! (One of my friends actually thought I made my story up…but I swear on the lives of my children, it’s 100% true. Sad…but true.)” ~ Marie Bollman, Make Your Own Damn Dinner

“My story is about how an ordinary day can go off the rails and head towards a meltdown before you realize it. Starting out with locking my keys in the car, and ending with my kids not doing the thing I’ve asked them (nagged them??) to do constantly. Meltdown city!” ~ Angela Keck, Writer Mom’s Blog

“It’s what REALLY happens when you find out your pregnant. From taking four pregnancy tests at once, to then driving directly to the OBGYN’s office holding my pee sticks; it was the meltdown before the baby was even born.” ~ Danielle Herzog, Martinis and Minivans

What did you like best about working on The Mother of All Meltdowns project?

“Hands down, my favorite part was getting to know all of the other collaborators and feeling less alone in my insanity!” ~ Rabia Lieber, The Liebers

“I loved being part of a group of terrific authors, bloggers and mothers! We come from all over the country and have different kinds of blog, yet we all have so much in common with each other, including our meltdowns.” ~ Ginny Marie, Lemon Drop Pie

“I loved putting together my story and realizing that it was just one part of a much bigger project. The most fun part of the project was when I got that first draft and read through all the stories and really got a sense of how it was all coming together.” ~ Karen B., Baking In A Tornado

What advice do you have for other mothers who melt from time-to-time?

“The next time you’re in a long check-out line, look at the person in front of you and know they’ve had a meltdown. Look at the person behind you and know they’ve had a meltdown. Go home and reread The Mother of All Meltdowns. You are not alone.” ~ Karen B., Baking In A Tornado

“Don’t pretend you can handle it all. If you’re stressed, talk about it. Motherhood is the toughest job there is. We can only get through it with the support of others who are going through it too. It’s okay not to be perfect, it’s okay to lose your cool, it’s okay to talk about it. We’re all in this together.” ~ Marie Bollman, Make Your Own Damn Dinner

“Meltdowns happen. I remember my mom (and dad) having meltdowns, and I do the same thing they did after blowing up at their kids. After we calm down, I take my kids in my arms and we cuddle, read a story, say we’re sorry and that we love each other.” ~ Ginny Marie, Lemon Drop Pie

What is your favorite story in the book? Why?

“Oh, there’s no way I could pick a favorite. I’d probably pick a different one depending on my mood throughout the day. That’s the beauty of the book. There are so many perspectives. At least one story will speak to you at any given time!” ~ Jennifer Barbour, Another Jennifer

“Do I really have to pick just one? I truly found myself nodding along with each one. Even if it was an occasion, like a teenager getting her driver’s, that I haven’t experienced yet, I still could understand the emotions. If I had to narrow it down, though, my two favorites were probably “A Dresser Full” by Ginny Marie (because I have TOTALLY been there with my daughter, too) and “The great Powdered Sugar Fight of 2007” by Marcia Kester Doyle (because it is a more joyful meltdown that actually sounded kind of fun!).” ~ Lisa Witherspoon, The Golden Spoons

“Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jennifer Barbour of Another Jennifer is one of my favorites because I can relate to trying to stay calm in public but then unleashing the frustration the minute you’re alone. Plus, I love a mom that admits she dropped the f-bomb since I’ve uttered that very word in a meltdown or two.” ~ AnnMarie Gubenko, Tidbits from the Queen of Chaos

Why should people buy the book?

“It’s freeing in a way. It makes you realize you aren’t alone. When you lose it, you feel like you’re the only one. But the reality is, we all have our moments. When we have a meltdown, it’s not just one thing that sets it off…it’s usually a series of events.” ~ Michelle Nahom, A Dish of Daily Life

“These stories could be shared by your best girlfriends sitting around a coffee shop and that’s exactly how it reads. It feels like you are sharing your worst moments with a group of women who totally get it. We could all use a little community in our lives and the feeling that we’re not on our own.” ~ Melissa Galileo, Completely Eclipsed

“To read talented writing! And just as importantly, I think if you are a parent, or you’re going to be a parent, or you had a parent, (so that makes everyone) you will be able to relate to these stories. Each one is unique and there are obviously many incidents that set us off into the land of meltdowns. It’s nice to get perspective because the 30 writers of our book tell very different stories, and each one is powerful in its own right.” ~ Tamara Bowman, Tamara (Like) Camera Blog

If you could associate any one song with the word meltdown, what would it be and why?

“I would choose “I’m Sexy And I Know It” – I have to keep telling myself that when I have a Goldfish stuck on my ass and spit up in my hair.” ~ Danielle Herzog, Martinis and Minivans

“I never thought about a song for meltdowns, first one that comes to mind is Hysteria by Def Leppard because a meltdown is definitely becoming hysterical! (And you’re welcome because I’m sure the song is now stuck in your head…)” ~ Angela Keck, Writer Mom’s Blog

“I can’t help thinking about “End of the World” by R.E.M. Just when he starts going off and singing all of those lyrics very fast and even if you Google the lyrics, you can’t quite repeat what he’s saying? That’s totally it for me.” ~ Tamara Bowman, Tamara (Like) Camera Blog

What made you want to contribute to The Mother of All Meltdowns?

“I think in some ways, it allowed me to look back on that time with fresh eyes and see what I learned from it. I think getting away from the stress would have been helpful for me. It’s not as if I didn’t have the support. My in laws live next door, and they were a tremendous help. But I was in a tunnel…my stress level was over the top at that point. Going through this also gave me a new respect for how precious life really is.” ~ Michelle Nahom, A Dish of Daily Life

“Honestly, I was a little intimidated at first because I wasn’t sure if I wanted to share my worst moment! What would people think? Then, I realized that I would love to read other mothers’ real stories of the challenges of motherhood and how it overwhelmed them sometimes. The great part is that we also share how we overcame the meltdowns. Being a part of such a talented group of writers was also a no brainer!” ~ Jennifer Barbour, Another Jennifer

“Several things made me want to contribute. For one thing, when I saw the list of others who would be contributing, I knew I was in excellent company and felt honored to be included on the project with them. I also liked the idea of the project – sharing our worst moments; laughing at ourselves a little, and, hopefully, offering some comfort to other mothers. Finally, I won’t lie – the knowledge that something I wrote was actually going to be published for the whole world to read was incredibly exciting (and it still is!).” ~ Lisa Witherspoon, The Golden Spoon

What’s next for you?

“I’ve been working on a couple of articles for Queen Latifah’s website, and one has been published already. Another story of mine will be in the book Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dating Game, coming out in December. And of course, I’ll be writing on my blog, LemonDropPie.com. If Crystal has a follow-up project for The Mother of All Meltdowns, I’m in! It has been such a pleasure to be a part of this book.” ~ Ginny Marie, Lemon Drop Pie

“I’m writing a memoir about the letters my grandmother and I wrote to each other for over a decade. It’s the story of my life weaved through our correspondence. It’s her words of advice and wisdom she shared with me during my clueless thirty-something years of life.” ~ Danielle Herzog, Martinis and Minivans

“I’ll just keep muddling my way through motherhood and blogging about all my misadventures at Make Your Own Damn Dinner.” ~ Marie Bollman, Make Your Own Damn Dinner

thecrumbdiaries

Logan is challenged but not limited, and he is living his life like a boss. I am just lucky enough to be along for the ride.

Mommy Got Her Groove Back

How a new mom, and wife does parenting and daily life.

The Formerly Hot Housewife

weight loss, healing, and new self discoveries

Lessons from my daughter

Although all doctors agreed she would do nothing.....

I'm fine, but my Mommy has issues!

Raising a daughter with special needs.

Living on the Spectrum: The Connor Chronicles

Our family's adventures in the world of ADHD and Autism.

Parenting And Stuff

Not a "how to be a great parent" blog

don of all trades

Master of none...

The Third Glance

A peek into my (Autistic) mind

One Stitch At A Time

Making my way back in time.

Mom Rants and Comfy Pants

Ramblings From a Veteran Mom Who Hates Skinny Jeans. Ever Feel Like You're Swimming Upstream?

Disability Watchdog

Exposing Injustices for Vulnerable People

My thoughts on a page.

Living, Laughing, Loving, Loathing.

It is Well...with my Soul

Sure, my hands are full. So is my HEART!

Chopping Potatoes

And other metaphors for motherhood

This is the Corner We Pee In

Bulletins from the Parenting Trenches...

clotildajamcracker

The wacky stories of a crazy lady.

This is the place

visiting places where writers were born, lived, loved & are buried.

motherslittlesteps.com/

Motherhood and Coastal Living

%d bloggers like this: